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Port City Politics
Port City Politics

Port City Politics is a podcast collaboration between WECT and WHQR. Every two weeks, WECT’s investigative reporter Michael Praats and WHQR’s News Director Ben Schachtman will break down the latest happenings in local politics.

Latest Episodes
  • On this episode, a look at some big fiscal questions. First up, WECT investigative reporter Michael Praats is following the legal and financial issues dogging New Hanover County Chairwoman Julia Olson-Boseman. Then, WHQR and WECT continue to look into the salary of Cape Fear Community College President Jim Morton, which is trending ever higher. And a look at New Hanover County’s Project Grace — the county hopes to win the state over with a rosy financial prediction of the project’s economic benefits, but will the state go for it?
  • On this episode: the personal allegations against New Hanover County Chairwoman Julia Olson-Boseman aren't pretty, and some might dismiss them as tabloid fodder. But they help paint a broader picture of the financial and ethical choices made by one of the region's most powerful local elected officials.
  • The Chairwoman of the New Hanover County Board of Commissioners was held in contempt this week by a Wake Couty judge. Olson-Boseman had been ordered to turn over financial documents related to her now-shuttered law office but apparently went on vacation to Europe instead of appearing in court.
  • On this episode, we look at the recent law enforcement investigation into public school libraries, where it came from, and legal context around it. Then, the latest on the death of Val D'Auvray, and how the laws around reporting missing people seems to have failed him.
  • On this episode: the North Carolina State Bar says New Hanover County Chair Julia Olson-Boseman mismanaged client funds and then lied about it — and they're not letting the issue go. Plus, Jason Minnicozzi was the Democratic candidate preparing to take on Republican incumbent Michael Lee for State Senate District 7... until he wasn't. And, Leland's aspirations for expanding its boundaries get checked by the state.
  • On this episode, the latest trouble for New Hanover County Chairperson Julia Olson-Boseman, who now must appear before a judge to defend herself from criminal contempt. Plus, a lawsuit's allegations suggest that issues leading to the transfer of the Wilmington Police Department crime lab to the New Hanover County Sheriff's Office were downplayed and kept from the public.
  • On this episode, we get into the latest on the death of Val Flor D’Auvray, who was found dead on the property of the Tru Colors brewery in downtown Wilmington. Then, the termination of an employee of New Hanover County's new Port City United violence-disruption program raises questions about how the government handles past and present criminal behavior. Plus, the Cape Fear Club — an all-male club founded in the mid-19th century — killed Downtown Alive.
  • On this edition, we dig into hundreds of pages of new documents released as part of former Wilmington Police Department officer Brian Gilmore’s civil suit against the city, which paint a fuller picture of how disturbing the case was against Gilmore and fellow officers Kevin Piner and Jesse Moore. Plus, more on the strange case of a man found dead on the Tru Colors brewery property.
  • On this episode, we'll get into two town halls held jointly by WHQR, WECT, and Port City Daily. Plus, after almost a year of issues surrounding New Hanover County Chair Julia Olson-Boseman, one commissioner finally addresses the topic.
  • On this episode, the North Carolina Court of Appeals (mostly) closes the case of Wilmington's problematic short-term rental regulations. Plus, New Hanover County commissioners backtrack on an ordinance that effectively criminalized homelessness on county property — but what can be done instead? And, the $1.25 billion New Hanover Community Endowment is looking for community advisors. What will their role be?