Coronavirus Coverage

Gathered at the bottom of this page is WHQR's ongoing reporting and coverage on COVID-19. In addition, here are case trackers, and a list of other resources pertaining to the virus.

For questions/concerns about COVID-19, call the NC Coronavirus Helpline at 1-866-462-3821.  NC Poison Control officials staff the Helpline 24-hours a day. To find out about availability of community resources, call 211 or visit nc211.org

For Brunswick County, the COVID-19 Helpline is 910-253-2339, and is staffed M-F from 9 AM to 5 PM.The email is coronavirus@brunswickcountync.gov. New Hanover County's Helpline is 910-798-6800. That line is open 7 days a week from 7:30 AM to 6 PM. 

For more graphs, check out WHQR's Data and Case Tracker:

For resources during the pandemic, go to WHQR's Community Resources:

And to stay up to date, check out WHQR's Coronavirus Updates Page:

Quick National Resources  

Quick Local Resources

Walnut Creek Amphitheater

North Carolina is taking another step towards re-opening.  As Covid-19 metrics continue to stabilize, Governor Roy Cooper is also announcing new relief money for small businesses and a new Covid app.  

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At this week’s City Council meeting, Wilmington leaders approved allocating COVID-19 Relief Funds to Good Shepherd, as well as an agreement for the long-anticipated development at Castle Street. But it was proposed Riverwalk improvements and WAVE’s redevelopment that drew the most debate from council. 

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With no clear end to the pandemic in sight, food insecurity is skyrocketing. And local organizations in the Cape Fear region are bracing for the long haul. 

Vince Winkel


Wilmington’s Downtown Alive project has been extended through mid-October. That’s the initiative that opened downtown streets for expanded restaurant seating during the pandemic. City leaders approved the extension unanimously -- but reluctantly. 

https://www.ncdps.gov/news-conference


  At his Tuesday afternoon press conference, Governor Roy Cooper announced the easing of COVID-19 restrictions. WHQR reports Phase 2.5 of his safer-at-home policy will go into effect this Friday, September 4th at 5 P.M.   

WHQR files

Over the weekend, the University of North Carolina-Wilmington identified its third COVID cluster on campus. On Monday night, that number grew to four. As a graduate student, I was able to get a firsthand look at the university's testing process. 

Two Covid Clusters Arrive At UNCW

Aug 28, 2020
Adobe Stock

The University of North Carolina-Wilmington has identified two clusters of COVID-19 in campus dorms. 

It wasn't entirely unexpected. 

https://www.ncdps.gov/storm-update


  As the number of Covid-19 cases in North Carolina continues to stabilize, WHQR has details on the Governor’s new budget proposal.      

UNCW Twitter

Coronavirus clusters are popping up on college campuses across the nation. WHQR spoke with UNCW students about the risks of campus life.  

ncdps.gov/UNC TV

  At his Wednesday, August 19th press conference, Governor Roy Cooper announced the metrics the state uses to determine the severity of the coronavirus are stable, and some are even declining. As WHQR reports, he also pledged $12 million dollars to expand Internet services across the state.

As college students return to campus for the fall semester, COVID cases in dorms are on the rise, and faculty and employees on UNC campuses are expressing fear for their safety. 

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North Carolina’s moratorium on evictions expired in late June. The federal moratorium ended a month later. As a result, housing advocates are bracing for a wave of evictions in the upcoming months -- and local governments and non-profits are stepping in to help.

RLH

Covid-19 trends in North Carolina are heading down, but state officials say the real test is coming soon. 

As colleges and universities welcome students back to school, law enforcement officials across the state will be watching closely.

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper credits social distancing, the early shutdowns, a cautious re-opening, and face masks with bringing down the coronavirus numbers in North Carolina. 

Cape Fear Collective

                                        

Covid-19 shut down North Carolina in March.  A cautious re-opening plan by state officials has led to a flattening of the case count curve, but the restrictions have also stalled commerce. 

Ending Saturday, August 8th, this past week’s top stories include Hurricane Isaias blowing through the Cape Fear region and the on-going question of how to reopen schools safely durng a global pandemic. Take a listen below.

NHCS

Hurricane Isaias accomplished what even Covid-19 couldn’t do:  delayed the start of the new academic year for students at year-round schools in New Hanover County.  Traditional schools are still slated to begin August 17th. 

Back To School In NC: Keeping COVID-19 Out Of Classrooms

Aug 5, 2020
Brooke Bust-Webber / WUNC

Families across North Carolina are preparing to start a new school year in the midst of an ongoing pandemic. Most public school students are starting school online, but each school district around the state is doing things a little bit differently under guidelines released by Gov. Roy Cooper in July.

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Impacts from Tropical Storm Isaias remain in the Cape Fear Region, including the City of Wilmington. Natosha Tew is Wilmington's Emergency Management Coordinator. She spoke with WHQR about storm recovery efforts in the city. 

RLH

North Carolina’s Covid-19 trends are stabilizing.  It’s good news, according to state health officials – and it’s directly correlated with the statewide mask mandate.

WHQR has details on a new Executive Order effective Friday, July 31st.   

For ongoing reporting and coverage on COVID-19, as well as a case tracker, go here.

For an up-to-date list of resources available to our community during the coronavirus outbreak, go here

Gathered below are general updates on closures, openings, local, state and federal efforts and other developments in the coronavirus battle.   

RLH

North Carolina set a record over the weekend for the highest number of new cases in a single day.  Health officials still describe the state’s coronavirus situation as a simmer, though, and not a boil.   

RLH


  Covid-19 continues to simmer in North Carolina, but has not yet boiled over.  Still, the numbers are not going down.

NHCS


 Almost 4 out of 10 New Hanover County School teachers say they have personal issues that prevent them from working face-to-face with students. That’s according to a newly released survey by the school system. But as WHQR’s reports, New Hanover County has chosen to implement Governor Roy Cooper’s Plan B, which involves all staff returning in-person.   

NHC

It’s been a very busy year in the Cape Fear Region, and for WHQR Public Media.

This 18-minute audio compilation highlights the COVID-19 news coverage of WHQR from early March through June 30.

WHQR News is Rachel Lewis Hilburn, Katelyn Freund, Hannah Breisinger, Rachel Keith and Vince Winkel. Doc Jarden is acting News Director.

Wikimedia Commons

School will open for at least part-time in-person learning this year.  That’s the message from North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper.  Despite the continued spread of Covid-19, state officials say the science shows keeping kids completely out of school is more dangerous than risks from the virus.  

RLH

Before the Coronavirus, independent living facilities could seem like an adventure cruise – meals in an elegant dining room, loads of social activities, and friendly people.  But in the age of Covid-19, life inside a retirement community carries strict new protocols.

The number of COVID-19 cases in North Carolina continues to rise. Thursday afternoon Gov. Roy Cooper addressed both the increase, and the issue of schools reopening. 

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