Sea level rise

contributed photo / Robert Parr

Coastal communities on barrier islands will not exist as they are in 30 to 150 years from now.  

Chief Yeoman Alphonso Braggs, US Navy

The ice sheets that blanket Antarctica and Greenland are melting faster, and that fact is a source of concern and intense study by climate researchers. 

Robert Parr

North Carolina has a controversial history when it comes to its willingness to accept and plan for sea level rise.  In 2012, the state legislature enacted a multi-year moratorium on considering data from a science panel for future planning and policymaking.  That moratorium has since lifted and a new study out last year, looking at the next 30 years, is now accepted as a reasonable basis for policymaking.

The North Carolina Chapter of the US Green Building Council is holding its signature social event on Thursday, May 12 at Bluewater Waterfront Grill in Wrightsville Beach: Climate Change, Sea Level Rise, & Resilient Design.  The buffet dinner, beginning at 6:00 pm,  features a stude

Open Blue

The United Nations Climate Change Summit is underway in Paris, and for the first time in years, world leaders are hopeful a global agreement is possible.  Without organized cooperation, NASA scientists say the Earth will see an escalation of catastrophic weather events – such as longer and more intense heat waves, more severe storms, flooding, sea level rise… the list goes on – impacting everything from human health to food production. 

This broadcast of CoastLine originally aired on August 6, 2014.

What does sea level rise, now widely-accepted by the scientific community, mean for coastal areas in North Carolina?  How concerned do we really need to be?