flooding

Jeff Hunter

About half of WHQR’s staff left Wilmington to avoid Hurricane Florence. Jeff Hunter was the first of the staff to return -- and it wasn’t an easy journey. Jeff told WHQR’s Gina Gambony about the slow road home.

RLH

Flooding will affect the Cape Fear region at least through this week, but the rainfall will be the least of it.

First, the good news:  the Cape Fear region has seen the majority of the rain from Florence. 

Vince Winkel

Tropical Storm Florence is still impacting the Cape Fear region – and is likely to continue through tonight. 

Now officials turn their attention to the risk of flooding, flash flooding, and tornadoes. 

Robert Parr

North Carolina has a controversial history when it comes to its willingness to accept and plan for sea level rise.  In 2012, the state legislature enacted a multi-year moratorium on considering data from a science panel for future planning and policymaking.  That moratorium has since lifted and a new study out last year, looking at the next 30 years, is now accepted as a reasonable basis for policymaking.

City of Wilmington

The pounding rain that has blanketed the Cape Fear region for the last several days is easing up.  Some activities are a "go" tonight -- such as Cinematique and CFCC's Beauty and the Beast.  But local officials aren't ready to sound the all-clear yet.

The rain isn't quite over, but it's not expected to have as much of an impact as it's had over the last few days.  Steven Pfaff is a Warning Coordination Meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Wilmington.  Some areas, says Pfaff, will continue to grapple with flooding.

City of Wilmington

New Hanover, Brunswick, and Pender County Schools are all closed Monday.  Cape Fear Community College has also closed all of its campus locations.  City of Wilmington, New Hanover County, and Brunswick County Offices and Courts are closed. 

This is hardly an exhaustive list, but it illustrates the point:  driving conditions are hazardous due to flooding and the potential for downed trees.

By Tuesday, a drying trend will set in, which makes Monday the last day the area will see significant heavy rainfall from the current systems. 

National Hurricane Center / NOAA

Now that Hurricane Joaquin's projected path turns farther east, as the European meteorological models had predicted, state and local emergency management officials say they’re more confident the storm will stay well offshore.  But there are still statewide warnings about flooding and its ancillary effects.

U.S. Geological Survey

Storm surge, coastal flooding, and beach erosion.  Those are the likely impacts from the combination of a wet system moving up from the Gulf of Mexico and the arrival of Hurricane Joaquin – now a Category Four storm.  But New Hanover County Emergency officials say it won’t be until Friday afternoon that they’ll have any confidence in the forecast track for Joaquin.

Hurricane Joaquin, now a dangerous Category Four storm, is still highly unpredictable.  In preparation for potentially severe weather and heavy flooding, Governor Pat McCrory declared a state of emergency for all 100 counties in North Carolina.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

The 2015 hurricane season begins Monday, June 1. And although the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration—or NOAA—predicts a slower season than usual, that doesn’t mean coastal residents can let down their guard.

Though estimates are low for this hurricane season, those numbers do not reflect the potential impact to the region. That’s according to Michael Colby, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.