CoastLine

Rountree Losee

On November 15, 1864, William Tecumseh Sherman began his “March to the Sea” from Atlanta to Savannah.  It was the beginning of a major blow to the Confederacy during the American Civil War.  While the 19th century sounds like ancient history to some of us, there exists a tangible division in this country which has this year, played out in an emotional debate over how to treat Confederate monuments and statues. 

Fracaswell Hyman says he didn’t set out to be a writer.  Despite that, he spent years writing for Nickelodeon – on the shows Little Bill, Taina, Gullah Gullah Island.  We’ll hear about those years – but we’re also here today to talk about his first middle-grade novel, Mango Delight.  And we’ll find out what he thought he was setting out to do for a career and before he unwittingly fell into a life of writing – which he now characterizes as “writing for my life”. 

It’s the last election-related show we’ll have in 2017.  The day after a small percentage of eligible of voters went to the polls to choose leaders for the boards of towns and cities, we’re taking a look at what happened, what it could say about what’s on voters’ minds, and where we go from here. 

Also on this edition, we spend a great deal of time on why people didn't vote -- with lots of listeners chiming in via email and phone calls. 

Guests:

On this edition, we meet candidates from Oak Island and Kure Beach – two beach towns in southeastern North Carolina.

On this edition of the CoastLine Candidate Interviews, our focus is largely on Oak Island in Brunswick County.  We meet Kevin Lindsey and John Bach – both running for a seat on Town Council there. 

Our focus today is first on Oak Island and then Kure Beach – two beach towns in southeastern North Carolina.  In the Brunswick County Town of Oak Island, six candidates are running for two open seats on council.  Kenny Rogers, whom we will meet today, is challenging Mayor Cin Brochure as she seeks her second term. 

In the two later segments, we’ll meet two people seeking a seat on the Town Council of Kure Beach, located in New Hanover County:  John Ellen and Jerry Dockery.

Segment 1:  Kenny Rogers -- Oak Island Town Council

Our focus here is again on Carolina Beach – the largest beach town in New Hanover County.  At an estimated population of about 6,000,  the town is more than double the size of the county's next largest, Wrightsville Beach.  Median household income is around $60,000 -- higher than nearby Wilmington. 

Two people seeking one of the two open seats on Carolina Beach Town Council are with us today:  Tammy Hanson and LeAnn Pierce.  We will meet them in segments 2 and 3.

Carolina Beach is the largest of the three beach towns in New Hanover County.  At an estimated population of about 6,000 – more than double the size of the next largest, Wrightsville Beach.  Median household income is around 60-thousand – higher than nearby Wilmington. 

The town is governed by a Council made up of four members and a mayor.   Here, we meet two of the five candidates seeking a Council seat in Carolina Beach.  We also meet the man challenging Mayor Dan Wilcox for his seat this year.

New Hanover County is made up of four municipalities:  the City of Wilmington, three beach towns, and some unincorporated areas.  Wrightsville Beach is one of those three beach towns – governed by a Mayor and Board of Aldermen.  The population, according to the U.S.

On this edition of the CoastLine Candidate Interviews, we meet the two people hoping to be the next mayor of the City of Southport.  We also meet one candidate running for Southport’s Board of Aldermen in Ward 1; Karen Mosteller is also the only incumbent seeking re-election in that Ward.  The other person with an expiring term, Mary Ellen Poole, is not running again.

On this edition of CoastLine, we meet two of the five candidates seeking a seat on the Board of Aldermen in Wrightsville Beach.  We’ll also meet one person running for Southport’s Board of Aldermen in Ward 2.

First, Southport: 

This 225-year-old city spanning less than four square miles near the confluence of the Cape Fear River and the Atlantic Ocean in Brunswick County was voted America’s Happiest Seaside Town by Coastal Living in 2015.  Today, the U.S. Census Bureau estimates that about 36-hundred people call Southport home. 

On this edition of CoastLine, we meet two of three candidates seeking one of two open seats on Southport’s Board of Aldermen in Ward 1.  This small seaside city in Brunswick County is divided into two wards – each represented by three people to make up a six-member board.  The Mayor of the City of Southport serves a two-year term.  Aldermen serve four-year terms which are staggered.

On this edition of the CoastLine Candidate Interviews, we meet one candidate for Leland’s Town Council and one for Board of Commissioners of Brunswick Regional Water and Sewer H2GO. 

But first, we take a closer look at municipal elections with a political scientist.   

Segment 1:  Aaron King, Assistant Professor in the Department of Public and International Affairs at the University of North Carolina Wilmington

The Town of Leland turned 28 years old in September.  The current population, according to estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau, is just under 19,000 people.  That’s growth of about 37% in just the last six years.  Leland is part of the Myrtle Beach Metropolitan Statistical Area despite its proximity to Wilmington.  That was a change a major change for Brunswick County which took effect two years ago.  

The Town of Leland turned 28 years old this month.  The current population, according to estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau, is just under 19,000 people.  That’s growth of about 37% in just the last six years.  Leland is part of the Myrtle Beach Metropolitan Statistical Area – despite its proximity to Wilmington.  That was a change a major change for Brunswick County which took effect two years ago.  

In the nonpartisan race for Wilmington’s City Council, there are nine people competing for three open seats that carry four-year terms.  Two incumbents are hoping for reelection; they are with us today.  And one seat is wide open since Earl Sheridan decided not to run again. 

Despite the fact that presidential election years turn out the highest numbers of voters, municipal elections have the most direct impact on quality of life.  This fact is pretty widely accepted.  But even the most educated and engaged among us – most notably a political scientist at an esteemed local university – even they are unlikely to know the people who are running for Wilmington’s City Council.

City of Wilmington

Wilmington is home to more than 117-thousand people.   That’s growth of about 11,000 people since the last census in 2010.  73% of the population identifies as white, less than 20% is African-American, and 6% is Latino or Hispanic.

The City of Wilmington is home to more than 117-thousand people.   That’s growth of about 11,000 people since the last census in 2010.  73% of the population identifies as white, less than 20% is African-American, and 6% is Latino or Hispanic.

On this edition of the CoastLine Candidate Interviews, we spend the first segment with one candidate for the Wrightsville Beach Board of Aldermen.  The remaining two segments feature candidates running for Brunswick Regional Water and Sewer H2GO, popularly known as H2GO – who have opposing views on whether to build a reverse osmosis plant. 

Segment 1:  Pat Prince for Wrightsville Beach Board of Aldermen

Brunswick Regional Water and Sewer H2GO, popularly known as H2GO, is a water and sewer utility in Brunswick County that serves the northeast portion of the County including Leland, Belville, parts of Navassa, and some customers located outside of these municipal boundaries.  H2GO serves over 10,000 water customers and nearly 6,000 sewer customers.

Judy Girard

This episode first aired on April 21, 2016. 

August 25, 2017 update:  Judy Girard serves as Vice Chair of the GLOW Academy School Board which is now open.

Judy Girard started her television career in the late 1960s and worked her way through the halls of NBC in New York – where she developed shows such as Maury Povich, Jenny Jones, and Jerry Springer.  Her decision to move the Phil Donahue show to New York helped solidify it as the pre-eminent talk show in the country. 

U.S. Department of Justice

This episode first aired on May 26, 2016.

August 25, 2017 update:  Lindsey Roberson now serves as a Trial Attorney in the Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit, Civil Rights Division, at the U.S. Department of Justice. 

Read the Transcript Here. Read the Emails Here.

Within the City of Wilmington, statues and street names honoring key members of the Confederacy pepper the landscape.  At the entrance to downtown Wilmington, on one corner stands a statue of George Davis, Confederate Attorney General.  At a nearby intersection, a monument honoring soldiers of the Confederacy stands. 

Bonnie Monteleone

When you use a disposable diaper, some scientists would tell you the plastic in that diaper actually stays in the environment for hundreds of years.  The plastic bag you brought home from the grocery store?  Estimates vary, but some put the number of years it takes to decompose as high as one thousand.  Whether those numbers are accurate or more research needs to be done doesn’t change what we know about how plastics are showing up in oceans all over the world – and not only harming marine life – but becoming part of the human food chain. 

Pixabay

13 Reasons Why – first a book, then a Netflix series, tells the story of Hannah Baker, a high school student who dies by suicide.  But before she carries it out, she creates old-school cassette tapes – each one telling the story of a particular person who hurt her which add up to the 13 reasons why she decided to die.  They’re various injuries, small and large, including her rape by a classmate.   

Skeeze / Pixabay

With the region’s latest heat wave and the tropical soup that’s spawned Hurricane Gert and three other potential systems in the North Atlantic, it’s hard to think about getting outside and planting anything that isn’t zoned for a humid, subtropical climate. 

But fall will be here before you know it, and in southeastern North Carolina and northeastern South Carolina, fall is a great time to plant.  We find out why on this edition of CoastLine from our experts, and we hear about the latest garden trends, but most importantly, we get your gardening questions answered.

Hannes Grobe / Wikimedia Commons

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President Donald Trump signed an executive order in late April to expand energy exploration drilling in the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans.  The order puts in place a new five-year program, 2019-2024, that will supersede the earlier one – essentially reversing the Obama Administration’s decision to remove the mid-Atlantic region from consideration for offshore drilling. 

There are crooks, criminals, and hucksters out there trying to get your money through investment scams, retail fraud, identity theft, and they’ve been there since commerce began.  But are there degrees of hucksterism?  What’s the line between an enthusiastic entrepreneur with a brilliant, albeit untested idea versus a good, old-fashioned snake oil salesman who doesn’t really care if what’s in the bottle he’s selling doesn’t work?  His goal:  to make the sale and move on. 

Oxford University Press

If you’ve ever marveled at the artistry of Citizen Kane or sneered at the 1990s cult film Starship Troopers  or decided that Raging Bull is the greatest film of all time, then today’s discussion is for you.  We explore why films give us pleasure.

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