CAFOs

Vince Winkel

According to the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, there are now over 100 million hogs and chickens living in factory farms in North Carolina.   Dozens of these Concentrated Animal Feed Operations – or CAFOs – are in the Cape Fear Region. And a new survey shows that people in the state aren’t too happy about it.

Courtesy of EWG

On Friday, Gov. Roy Cooper vetoed House Bill 467. That’s a bill we reported on last week, that would impact those who live near concentrated animal feeding operations or CAFOs. The bill would have created new restrictions for CAFO neighbors who file so-called nuisance lawsuits. 

Vince Winkel

North Carolina is the third largest producer of pork in the country, and that means a lot of hog farms. Those hog farms have neighbors. Sometimes those neighbors file what are called nuisance suits. But under a bill in the legislature, there could be new restrictions attached to those lawsuits. Penalties against hog and chicken farms would be limited to lost rental or property value because of the nearby farm.  


Wikimedia Commons

North Carolina is the second-largest pork producer in the United States.  The importance of the industry to the state’s economy – and by extension to the thousands of people whose livelihood it supports – is undeniable.  This is the third edition of CoastLine in our series on hog farming in the state.  In each episode, we’ve narrowed the focus to one aspect of hog production.  We’ve looked at the economics of it as well as questions around environmental justice.  We’ve explored why some scientists say Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations – or CAFOs – negatively impact water qual