All Things Considered from NPR

Mon-Fri 4PM – 6:30PM
  • Hosted by Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Melissa Block

Each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

Clinical psychologist Dr. Amelia Aldao answers listener questions about anxiety, and listeners share their stories of founding silver lining in a new reality.

NPR's politics and economics reporter answers listener questions about what small businesses should be ready for as states slowly reopen their economies.

NPR's politics and economics reporter answers listener questions about what small businesses should be ready for as states slowly reopen their economies.

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If you want to know what President Trump really thinks, just check out his Twitter feed. He uses the social media platform to share his views on everything from international treaties to TV news segments. Plenty of those views have been controversial. But now, for the first time, Twitter says the president has gone too far. The company has put a warning label on a pair of tweets he sent today about mail-in ballots. NPR's Bobby Allyn covers Twitter and joins us to explain.

Hey, Bobby.

BOBBY ALLYN, BYLINE: Hey, Ailsa.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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As the number of COVID-19 deaths continues its upward march, many of the rituals designed to help people navigate the loss of a loved one aren't possible.

Renters In Arizona Struggle To Get Federal Rent Relief Assistance

15 hours ago

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

If you want to know what President Trump really thinks, just check out his Twitter feed. He uses the social media platform to share his views on everything from international treaties to TV news segments. Plenty of those views have been controversial. But now, for the first time, Twitter says the president has gone too far. The company has put a warning label on a pair of tweets he sent today about mail-in ballots. NPR's Bobby Allyn covers Twitter and joins us to explain.

Hey, Bobby.

BOBBY ALLYN, BYLINE: Hey, Ailsa.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

If you want to know what President Trump really thinks, just check out his Twitter feed. He uses the social media platform to share his views on everything from international treaties to TV news segments. Plenty of those views have been controversial. But now, for the first time, Twitter says the president has gone too far. The company has put a warning label on a pair of tweets he sent today about mail-in ballots. NPR's Bobby Allyn covers Twitter and joins us to explain.

Hey, Bobby.

BOBBY ALLYN, BYLINE: Hey, Ailsa.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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In the upside-down world that we now live in, the everyday can quickly morph into the essential. That's true of institutions, industries and people, too, which is what we'll hear in today's essential worker diary.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today, Memorial Day is tomorrow - a day to honor and remember those who died in service to the country. We wanted to talk about a new book that takes a fresh look at the aftermath of the Vietnam War. And when people think of that war, it's often framed in terms of devastation - tens of thousands killed, many more wounded physically and emotionally. And, of course, there was the political turmoil.

Author Interview: 'They Were Soldiers'

May 24, 2020

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today, Memorial Day is tomorrow - a day to honor and remember those who died in service to the country. We wanted to talk about a new book that takes a fresh look at the aftermath of the Vietnam War. And when people think of that war, it's often framed in terms of devastation - tens of thousands killed, many more wounded physically and emotionally. And, of course, there was the political turmoil.

Your No-Stress Playlist: K'Naan

May 23, 2020

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today, we're going to turn to our no-stress playlist. We've been building a list of songs you've told us bring you calm during these anxious times. Today's pick comes from Twitter user Courtney Strickland (ph) This is K'Naan's "Take A Minute."

Men's Soccer Returns In Germany

May 23, 2020

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

When will it be safe enough for sports to return? That's a question many fans have been asking throughout this pandemic. It's also a question that is extremely hard to answer for authorities and sports officials all over the world.

Long-Term Symptoms Of COVID-19

May 23, 2020

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Dr. Abraar Karan of Harvard Medical School and Catharine Hamm of the Los Angeles Times answer listener questions about traveling this summer.

Tips On How To Travel Safely This Summer

May 22, 2020

Dr. Abraar Karan of Harvard Medical School and Catharine Hamm of the Los Angeles Times answer listener questions about traveling this summer.

The Inglewood Army recruiting station is tucked into a strip mall in a gritty part of Los Angeles. Its neighbors are a liquor store, fast food outlets and palm trees. Inside are the familiar posters: smiling soldiers with the slogans "Army Strong" and "Army Team."

Sergeant First Class Nathan Anslow runs this station. He points to something new just inside the door. A stack of questionnaires — coronavirus screening forms. It's the first stop for potential recruits.

Living with the pandemic has been difficult for everyone: the isolation, the need to wear protective gear like masks and gloves, the adjustment to working or learning from home.

For those living with or caring for someone with severe autism, those challenges can be exponentially more difficult.

"Wearing gloves or masks, you know, things like that? That's just not going to happen here," says Feda Almaliti.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Many essential workers are making as much money now as they were before the pandemic, before their jobs got risky. But higher-risk jobs are supposed to pay more, so why isn't it happening? Here's Sarah Gonzalez with NPR's Planet Money podcast.

Copyright 2020 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

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A San Francisco institution is calling it quits. The Stud, the city's oldest LGBT community bar, could not survive the financial blow from the COVID-19 shutdown. From member station KQED in San Francisco, Holly J. McDede reports.

Lee Konitz, Bucky Pizzarelli, Ellis Marsalis, Wallace Roney and Henry Grimes are just a few of the jazz greats who have died in recent months from complications due to the coronavirus. Hear WBGO and Jazz Night in America's Christian McBride talk to about the toll the pandemic has taken on the jazz community, and read WBGO's Nate Chinen on the pain of grieving lost musicians during Jazz Appreciation Month in April.

The Washington Post's fashion critic Robin Givhan answers listener questions about the impact of the coronavirus on the fashion industry.

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