CoastLine: Pandemic Shutdown Opens Our Eyes To Nature

May 22, 2020

The red-cockaded woodpecker is not actually red – except for a tiny, nearly invisible red streak on male birds at the upper border of their cheek.  They’re mostly black and white.  And they were one of the first federally-protected species – landing on the Endangered Species list in 1970 – three years after officials created the first list in 1967.  (The Endangered Species Act had to wait until 1973.) 

Red-cockaded woodpeckers are still on that list more than half a century later.   

In North Carolina, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service identifies 22 species as Threatened, 44 as Endangered, and 52 as At-Risk.  Loggerhead and Green Sea Turtles are protected – along with varieties of plant such as Blue Ridge Goldenrod.  The Green Pitcher Plant and the Hawksbill Sea Turtle show up on the Endangered list, and the Magnificent Ramshorn Snail – a small mollusk – despite its grand name and whom we met on this program nearly a year ago – is considered at-risk. 

On this edition, we find out how biologists are helping some of these creatures to flourish and how researchers are exploring new ways to expand environmental literacy. 

Guests:  

Craig Ten Brink, Wildlife Biologist specializing in threatened and endangered species, Camp Lejeune

Troy Frensley, Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Resources:  

North American Association For Environmental Education

SciStarter -- a place for Citizen Scientists to find a project

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