Vince Winkel

REPORTER, WHQR NEWS

Vince Winkel joined the WHQR news team in March, 2017. He had previously been covering business and economics for the Greater Wilmington Business Journal.

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Vince began his career in public broadcasting with Monitor Radio in 1985, during which time his work received reporting awards from the Overseas Press Club of America, International Radio Festival of New York (Gold Medal), Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi, Gabriel Award: Best Feature-National Release, National Federation of Community Broadcasters, Colorado Press Association, Associated Press Television Association of California and others.

During his previous time in public radio he also was a contributor to Living on Earth, SoundPrint, Only a Game, NPR, Southern California Public Radio, Marketplace and the BBC.

Vince also helped launch Public Interactive, working with PBS and NPR stations across the country in developing content and publishing tools for station websites.

During an eight year break from radio, Vince was media director for BMW Motorcycles, managing their publications and digital media.

Vince Winkel

Julia Olson-Boseman is the new Chair of the New Hanover County Board of Commissioners. Patricia Kusek is Vice Chair. They were voted in Monday evening during a meeting that was, at times, contentious. 

Vince Winkel

More jobs are coming to the Pender Commerce Park just north of Wilmington. Gov. Roy Cooper and Wilmington Business Development officials made the announcement Tuesday afternoon at the facility off Highway 421.

Vince Winkel

November’s Bottega Live features two exciting bands from the Cape Fear Region. The Yard Doggs, and the Blarney Brogues. WHQR's Bottega Live airs each month in conjunction with Wilmington’s Fourth Friday Gallery Walk.

Vince Winkel

New Hanover County’s Partnership Advisory Group (PAG), charged with evaluating the future of the Regional Medical Center, has released its meeting schedule for the next five months. The PAG held its third public meeting last night.

Vince Winkel

The potential sale of New Hanover Regional Medical Center appears to have a new roadblock. It’s a nonprofit corporation launched today called, “Save Our Hospital.” The organization is not in favor of selling the healthcare system.

Vince Winkel

The future of WAVE Transit dominated Monday morning’s New Hanover County Commissioners’ meeting. A month ago, the Commissioners voted to end the county contract with the transportation system on July 1, 2021.  Today there was another funding vote.

Vince Winkel

This week the Partnership Advisory Group – that’s the group in charge of exploring the future of New Hanover Regional Medical Center – held its second public meeting. It was a class on the new landscape of the healthcare industry.

Vince Winkel

A new marker unveiled Friday in Wilmington refers to the events of November 1898 as a “coup” and not a “race riot” as other signs had in years past. The ceremony included reading the names of those known to have been killed on November 10, 1898.

Carolina Beach made history in yesterday’s election. It elected its first woman to serve as Mayor. Current town council member LeAnn Pierce is the new mayor-elect after receiving more than 1,000 votes. 

A newcomer to politics is the top vote-getter in the race for Leland Town Council. Veronica Carter is a retired Army Officer and former Civil Servant with almost 40 years of experience. 

Vince Winkel

Wilmington City Council has a new member. And the vote difference between staying on the Council or being voted off – was just six.

Vince Winkel

October’s Bottega Live features features three artists. The Caroliners, stories with Fudge Willi, and also Alex Lohr. WHQR's Bottega Live airs each month in conjunction with Wilmington’s Fourth Friday Gallery Walk.

Vince Winkel

New Hanover County Commissioners held their first public hearing on the future of New Hanover Regional Medical Center. About 100 people attended the hearing at Snipes Academy yesterday.

Vince Winkel

The overwhelming majority of climate scientists, international governmental bodies, and research institutes all agree: climate change is real. And with that comes sea level rise. What is unclear, however, is how fast it may happen. 

Vince Winkel

Tom Lombardi is one of three candidates running for the Board of Alderman in Southport’s Ward 1. Currently on the Board of Adjustment, he has served on various city committees since moving here in 2012.

Vince Winkel

UNCW professors Adam Jones and Thomas Simpson are forecasting partially cloudy skies for next year’s economic growth. The economists told an audience today at the University’s Economic Outlook Conference that despite strong numbers, wages aren’t keeping pace, and a recession may still be on the horizon. WHQR reports on an unlikely measure for this potential economic downturn.

Vince Winkel

In Oak Island Mike Defeo is on the Planning Board. He’s also running for a seat on Town Council. As we continue our series of profiles on those running for office in the region, WHQR has more on what Defeo is trying to accomplish.

Vince Winkel

In the run-up to the 2019 municipal elections, we find most candidates have the terms, “affordable housing” and “workforce housing” in their vernacular and high on their list of priorities. There is growing demand. But is there growing supply? 

As part of our 2019 Election Coverage, we’re bringing you profiles of candidates seeking to represent you in local towns and cities. Military veteran Dwight Torres is running for a seat on the Surf City Town Council. More communication is high on his agenda. 

David Gilbride is running for Surf City Town Council. It’s his first run for public office.  Gilbride thinks the council is too secretive and needs more transparency. 

Veronica Carter is a retired Army Officer and former Civil Servant with almost 40 years of experience managing logistical operations in the U.S. and overseas. Today she’s in the race for Leland Town Council. Carter says she’s running so some people don’t get left behind.

Vince Winkel

September’s Bottega Live features Stray Local, for the full hour. When the couple is not performing as Stray Local they are running the roads and trails along their tour route, competing in 5ks through marathons. WHQR's Bottega Live airs each month in conjunction with Wilmington’s Fourth Friday Gallery Walk.

In Carolina Beach, Debi DiNatale is running for Town Council. It’s her first run ever for public office. The owner of the Carolina Beach Inn says hospitality is critical to the town’s economy, and public safety is also high on her list.

Kevin Spears was born and raised in Wilmington and is on the ballot for Wilmington City Council. As a community activist, he works to combat youth gang violence. He's concerned about Council’s priorities.

Vince Winkel

The New Hanover County Board of Commissioners, in a 3 – 2 split vote, have moved to pursue the possible sale of New Hanover Regional Medical Center. That means the largest employer in the county, a healthcare system that serves seven counties, could soon be on the market. 

Harry Smith Jr. is running for the first time for Wilmington City Council. After watching this year’s short-term rental housing debate, he decided to get involved.  He’s not a fan of how the city gets things done.

NHRMC

On Monday, New Hanover County Commissioners voted to clear a path to explore the sale of the New Hanover Regional Medical Center. It doesn’t guarantee the not-for-profit healthcare system will be sold, but it opens the door to such a possibility. WHQR looks at how we got here.

Wilmington sales executive Neil Anderson is hoping to win his third term on City Council. He serves on the Transportation Committee and says a key to the continued development of the region will depend on rail and port improvements, and work along the Route 421 Corridor. 

Wilmington City Council Member Paul Lawler is running to win a second term. One of his priorities:  how the City can recruit more high-paying jobs to the area. And he’d like to see public transportation in the region improve and grow. 

By early afternoon Friday business owners were removing the plywood panels over their windows downtown, and residents were raking leaves and debris in their yards. It was almost like Dorian was never here for some. 

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