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Cokie Robert's storied career at National Public Radio and ABC News took her to the heights of her profession. But her values put family and relationships above all else.

Nailed It! is a competition show where home bakers try to re-create elaborate cakes — and often fail spectacularly.

"Our show is truly like: As long as you don't kill people with your food, you might win!" says co-host Nicole Byer.

So when Byer learned the Netflix program was nominated for an Emmy, she was shocked.

"The call I got from Netflix, one of the execs on the show, she was like ... 'We were — nominated?'" Byer says. "Everybody was surprised."

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Iran expert Ali Vaez about the view from Tehran on the recent airstrikes in Saudi Arabia that have left the kingdom's oil production crippled. Iran denies involvement.

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with journalist James Verini about his book They Will Have To Die Now, a vivid story of the battle to retake the Iraqi city of Mosul from the Islamic State in 2016.

With the ease of uploading music online, Internet sensations are made everyday. But for one rising bedroom pop artist, it was truly accidental ... almost.

Until recently, mxmtoon — who otherwise prefers to go by her first name, Maia — kept her music a secret from the people in her immediate life. Now, with her debut album, the masquerade, mxmtoon is slowly peeling back the layers of her online persona.

For the first time in half a century, the U.S. government just revised the way that it inspects pork slaughterhouses. The change has been long in coming. It's been debated, and even tried out at pilot plants, for the past 20 years. It gives pork companies themselves a bigger role in the inspection process. Critics call it privatization.

GM's decision to close five North American facilities has left some striking workers worrying if theirs may be next. Plants making cars have been hardest hit.

The New York Times seems unsure of how to handle the controversy sparked by a recent article offering new details on allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Big white tent complexes in two Texas border towns are drawing attention. The temporary courtrooms are the Trump administration's latest effort to quickly work through thousands of asylum cases.

Former All Things Considered host Linda Wertheimer remembers her friend and fellow "NPR Founding Mother" Cokie Roberts, who has died at age 75 of cancer.

Twitter and Facebook last month suspended hundreds of thousands of accounts and operations that they said were part of a Chinese state-linked disinformation campaign designed to discredit pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong.

A protest is mounting over one of the recipients of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's Global Goals Award, to be presented next week in New York City, as part of events surrounding the U.N. General Assembly. The award is given to individuals who have contributed to efforts to improve the lives of the poor.

John Cohen straddled two worlds: as a photographer, he immersed himself in the avant-garde visual arts scene of 1950s New York; as a musician, he was an integral part of that city's folk revival of the same era. He was a member of the seminal New Lost City Ramblers and he used every platform he could — photography, filmmaking, writing and record producing — to preserve and celebrate the music he loved. Cohen died Monday at age 87. His death was announced on social media by his son, Rufus Cohen.

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

President Trump's former campaign manager jousted with House Democrats on the Judiciary Committee Tuesday in a combative hearing that each side hoped might strengthen its narrative about the legacy of the Russia imbroglio.

Updated at 4:08 p.m. ET

The Department of Justice has filed a lawsuit against Edward Snowden alleging that his newly released memoir, Permanent Record, violates nondisclosure agreements he signed with the federal government. Justice Department lawyers say the U.S. is entitled to all of Snowden's book profits.

The civil lawsuit filed Tuesday in Virginia names the former National Security Agency contractor and his New York-based publisher, Macmillan.

Roberts, who died Tuesday, was a congressional correspondent in the early days of NPR, when there were few women reporters on radio or TV. She later joined ABC News. Originally broadcast in 1993.

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Eric Foner talks how the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments relate to current debates about voting rights, mass incarceration and reparations for slavery.

Updated at 3:25 p.m. ET

U.S. surveillance satellites detected Iran readying drones and missiles at launch sites in Iran before Saudi oil facilities were attacked on Saturday, according to two Defense Department officials.

The imagery has not been publicly released. The officials tell NPR that U.S. intelligence views the activity as "circumstantial evidence" that Iran launched the strike from its own soil.

Danny Brown Finds Peace On 'Best Life'

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In a hip-hop landscape where celebrity is suffocating and fan bases are becoming pressure cookers, it is reassuring that Dan

In 2015 the world's leaders committed to a sweeping set of targets to lift the world's poorest citizens into a decent life by 2030. Four years later, it's clear that the world is nowhere near on track to meet these 17 Sustainable Development Goals, and millions of children still face a lifetime of inequality because of factors such as where they are born, their gender and their race.

Sarah Thomas, an American ultra-marathon swimmer, has just completed a swim that no other human on the planet has ever accomplished.

The 37-year-old from Colorado plunged into waters off the shore of Dover, England, in the wee hours of Sunday morning. Her goal: swim the entire length of the English Channel.

Then do it again.

And again.

And again.

"My hometown, where I once lived, is a mountain village with blossoming flowers."

The lyrics to this folk song, which is sung in both Koreas, evoke nostalgia for a time and a place to which one can never return.

On a recent day, it is playing at a makeshift shrine in downtown Seoul. There's an altar with flowers, alongside photos of 42-year-old North Korean defector Han Seong-ok and her 6-year-old son, Kim Dong-jin.

Veteran journalist Cokie Roberts, who joined an upstart NPR in 1978 and left an indelible imprint on the growing network with her coverage of Washington politics before later going to ABC News, has died. She was 75.

Roberts died Tuesday because of complications from breast cancer, according to a family statement.

For Carlos Marroquín, the chickens are all that's left.

For the past several years, Marroquín has struggled to feed his wife and five children with the proceeds from their 10-acre corn farm. They live in a mud-brick house with a sloped terra cotta roof, nestled among pines, acacias and prickly pear cactus in Guatemala's mountainous northern Quiché region, part of the country's Dry Corridor that has been gripped by a multiyear drought.

Updated at 10:45 a.m. ET

An explosion at a campaign rally for Afghan President Ashraf Ghani killed at least 26 people and wounded more than 30 others on Tuesday. Ghani reportedly was not harmed in the bombing, for which the Taliban later claimed responsibility.

The Taliban also said it was behind a second attack in which a suicide bomber detonated a device in Kabul, in an area near the U.S. Embassy and other official buildings. At least 22 people died and dozens were injured in the blast around 1 p.m. local time, the Afghan Interior Ministry says.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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