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Unknown to hundreds of millions of Facebook users, their passwords were sitting in plain text inside the company's data storage, leaving them vulnerable to potential employee misuse and cyberattack for years.

"To be clear, these passwords were never visible to anyone outside of Facebook and we have found no evidence to date that anyone internally abused or improperly accessed them," Facebook's Vice President for Engineering, Security and Privacy Pedro Canahuati said in a statement Thursday.

The Trump administration has backed Israel's claim to sovereignty over the Golan Heights. The move comes weeks before Israeli general elections and reverses the position U.S. administrations have held for decades.

President Trump made the announcement via tweet Thursday.

"After 52 years it is time for the United States to fully recognize Israel's Sovereignty over the Golan Heights, which is of critical strategic and security importance to the State of Israel and Regional Stability!" the president wrote.

Jared Kushner's attorney told the House Committee on Oversight and Reform that Kushner uses private messaging applications and personal email to communicate about official White House matters, the committee wrote in a letter to White House Counsel Pat Cipollone on Thursday.

Radicalism, terrorism and hatred of perceived “others” is, sadly, as old as humanity. But the internet — social media platforms in particular — has proven to be the perfect delivery mechanism for this age-old poison.

Irsi Castillo clutches her 3-year-old daughter to her chest to shield her from the wind. They've just crossed the Rio Grande and stepped onto U.S. soil in El Paso, Texas, after traveling from Honduras.

Thousands of migrants like Castillo are crossing the border every day and turning themselves in to the Border Patrol. They're fleeing poverty and violence in Central America.

At a speech in Lima, Ohio, on Wednesday, President Donald Trump went off script into a five minute, ad-libbed attack on the late Senator John McCain, a celebrated Vietnam War vet and a former prisoner of war. Lost amid the unusual verbal attack on a deceased war hero by a sitting president was an inaccurate claim about veterans' issues.

President Trump slammed McCain for failing to pass a bill to expand VA services — a bill which in fact was originally sponsored by Senator McCain.

The numbers, World Poetry Day edition

8 hours ago

Every day, the editors at Marketplace put together what we call "the numbers," a daily segment on the show that gives listeners a snapshot of the stock market. This includes the S&P 500, the Dow Jones Industrial and other market indicators. 

Since we think World Poetry Day is just fine, let's do the numbers ... in rhyme.

Levi Strauss, the maker of jeans,
yearned to be back in the market, it seems.
Stone washed, unwashed, ripped to vent,
with its IPO, Levi’s zipped up 31.8 percent.

Today, ethnic studies is an accepted part of academia. Many if not most college students have taken a course or two. But 50 years ago, studying the history and culture of any people who were not white and Western was considered radical. Then came the longest student strike in U.S. history, at San Francisco State College, which changed everything.

The groundwork was laid for the strike a couple of years before, when black students organized to press for a black studies department and the admission of more black students.

There are 111,616 incarcerated women in the United States, a 7-fold increase since 1980. Some of these women are pregnant, but amid reports of women giving birth in their cells or shackled to hospital beds, prison and public health officials have no hard data on how many incarcerated women are pregnant, or on the outcomes of those pregnancies.

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Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen is in Texas today. She's there to get a firsthand look at what she's calling a catastrophe at the southern border, a catastrophe that she says is caused by a flood of migrants from Central America. At the current pace, Nielsen says almost 100,000 migrants will cross the border this month, far exceeding last month's total. NPR's Joel Rose reports on why the numbers keep going up and up.

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Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen is in Texas today. She's there to get a firsthand look at what she's calling a catastrophe at the southern border, a catastrophe that she says is caused by a flood of migrants from Central America. At the current pace, Nielsen says almost 100,000 migrants will cross the border this month, far exceeding last month's total. NPR's Joel Rose reports on why the numbers keep going up and up.

Updated at 10:30 p.m. ET

The world of political fundraising is about to get a lot more complicated and confusing thanks to a federal court ruling that could lead to the rise of more groups that seek to raise money off of a candidate's name, even if the group has nothing to do with that candidate.

On Thursday, U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan struck down the Federal Election Commission's rules that prohibited unauthorized political committees from using a candidate's name.

Midwest flooding has agriculture reeling

8 hours ago

Nebraska officials estimate that flooding has caused $1.3 billion in damage in the state, more than half of it to crops and cattle. The disaster there and in neighboring Iowa follows a difficult year for both states’ farmers, who’ve been reeling from the ongoing trade war and softening global economy. Now Iowa and Nebraska, with the second- and fourth-largest agricultural economies in the nation respectively, are contending with floodwaters that have washed away stored grain, killed herds of cattle and threaten the spring planting season.

Volvo’s website carries a statement from CEO and President Håkan Samuelsson: "Our vision is that by 2020 no one should be killed or seriously injured in a new Volvo car."

That deadline is fast approaching, and the aspiration is still looking out of reach, despite the company’s focus on safety tech, from safety cells surrounding passengers, to multiple airbags, to pedestrian detection and braking.

After eight years in Venezuela's National Guard, Lt. Juan Carlos Mora fled to Colombia last month, denounced President Nicolás Maduro and declared his support for Juan Guaidó, the opposition leader now recognized by the U.S. and about 50 other countries as the legitimate head of state.

Guaidó "is president and military commander," Mora said in an interview in Cúcuta, a Colombian city near the border with Venezuela. "He is now my boss."

In recent days, Rupert Murdoch's Fox News Channel and some of its corporate siblings have faced renewed and withering criticism for the way they depict Muslims and immigrants. Calls for boycotts of shows and pressure campaigns on advertisers ensued.

Last weekend, a Muslim news producer said she quit Fox's corporate cousin, Sky News Australia, over its coverage of Muslims following the massacre at two New Zealand mosques. Her post went viral.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen is in Texas today. She's there to get a firsthand look at what she's calling a catastrophe at the southern border, a catastrophe that she says is caused by a flood of migrants from Central America. At the current pace, Nielsen says almost 100,000 migrants will cross the border this month, far exceeding last month's total. NPR's Joel Rose reports on why the numbers keep going up and up.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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All right. Unless you're a Patriots fan, this last Super Bowl was a bore. The halftime show starring Maroon 5 was also pretty forgettable.

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Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen is in Texas today. She's there to get a firsthand look at what she's calling a catastrophe at the southern border, a catastrophe that she says is caused by a flood of migrants from Central America. At the current pace, Nielsen says almost 100,000 migrants will cross the border this month, far exceeding last month's total. NPR's Joel Rose reports on why the numbers keep going up and up.

The problem with low inflation

9 hours ago

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell spoke Wednesday about low inflation, which he called "one of the major challenges of our time." Historically, inflation concerns have more often been around too-high inflation, such as the U.S. experienced in the 1970s and early 1980s. But too little inflation can also be problematic, especially for the Federal Reserve's ability to stimulate the economy in a downturn. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Asian-Americans have the highest percentage of college grads of any minority group. And though they represent just 6 percent of the population, they account for 20 percent of Ivy League students. But once they enter the workforce, it's a different story. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Smart cars are getting smarter

9 hours ago

Volvo is planning to introduce tech that monitors the health and wakefulness of drivers. But do the benefits outweigh the privacy costs? Plus, China's tight video game regulations and what you can expect this season on our podcast The Uncertain Hour.

All official Washington — and indeed a wide swath of citizens from coast to coast — waits with great anticipation for the report from Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller.

Mueller, the former director of the FBI, is the war hero and Republican who was designated 22 months ago to investigate whether any Americans were involved with Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

One in nine women in the United States suffer from depression after childbirth. For some women, postpartum depression is so bad that they struggle to care for their children and may even consider or attempt suicide.

A judge has struck down the laws that Wisconsin Republicans passed in December's lame-duck session of the state's Legislature, restoring powers to Democratic Gov. Tony Evers, if only temporarily.

A county judge ruled on Thursday that all of the laws and appointments passed by legislators were unlawful because they met in what's known as an "extraordinary session," which isn't explicitly allowed under the state's constitution.

A British petition to cancel Brexit and remain in the European Union is drawing too much support for the U.K. government's website to handle, with the petition site crashing repeatedly on Thursday. More than 1 million people have signed the petition to revoke the triggering of Article 50 — blowing past the 100,000 signatures needed to compel a debate in Parliament. Article 50 is the EU treaty's exit clause.

Copyright 2019 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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