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Skin of Color Program recognizes unique needs of Black and Brown skin

According to the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, only 3% of skincare physicians are Black. (Getty Images)
According to the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, only 3% of skincare physicians are Black. (Getty Images)

We know the concept of race is a social construct, not something in our biology. But skin color is real, and it can affect healthcare. We’ve reported on studies showing that medical professionals often discriminate against people of color. According to the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, only 3% of skincare physicians are Black (only slightly more are Asian or Latino). And dermatologists are rarely trained to recognize the unique conditions and care of dark skin. Consequences range from patients not being taken seriously to missed diagnoses ending up in serious health consequences.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks to Dr. Deborah Scott. She’s co-director of the Skin of Color Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston — one of the country’s few centers devoted to this specialized care.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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