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A center run by the nonprofit Spanish Commission for Refugees in Málaga has been busy all summer. It's a colorful, two-story building with an outdoor courtyard, and people constantly come and go, speaking an array of languages and blasting music from their phones.

"Look, they're coming in now," says Francisco Cansino, the center's director. "They've just arrived."

Malaysian police have arrested the country's ex-prime minister, Najib Razak, who is now facing at least 21 charges related to more than $620 million in state money that wound up in his personal bank accounts.

Najib, 65, faces a variety of money-laundering charges, in addition to several charges of bribery and criminal breach of trust that were filed in July. He has pleaded not guilty in the case.

A former classmate of Christine Blasey Ford tells NPR that she does not know if an alleged sexual assault by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh took place as she first suggested on social media.

"That it happened or not, I have no idea," Cristina King Miranda told NPR's Nina Totenberg. "I can't say that it did or didn't."

That's different from what Miranda wrote Wednesday in a now-deleted Facebook post that stated definitively, "The incident DID happen, many of us heard about it in school."

(U.S. Edition) Jack Ma, the founder of online retail powerhouse Alibaba, once promised President Trump that his company would bring a million jobs to the U.S. by 2022. That promise is now being dialed back as the trade feud between the U.S. and China has escalated. Also, we have more with former senator Chris Dodd and former congressman Barney Frank, the duo who pushed through the huge financial reform law that bears their name.

Coverage of the fires raging through California this summer is hard for anyone to watch, but it's especially difficult for the Cates family.

"My wife can't even watch the news — it singes us to the core," says Chris Cates, a retired cardiologist whose family-owned Segassia Vineyard in Napa Valley, Calif., known for its rich cabernet, was ravaged by fires about this time last year.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … One of China’s biggest technology startups – dubbed the country’s Amazon for services – jumped more than 7 percent in its trading debut on the Hong Kong stock exchange after raising more than $4 billion dollars in its initial public offering. Then, global growth is forecast to plateau at just under 4 percent this year and next. We’ll talk to the OECD’s chief economist in Paris who says the biggest concern is trade.

Updated 11:35 a.m. Sep. 20 with portions of a statement from Ticketmaster in response to the CBC and Toronto Star's reporting.

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Bonus: the Dodd-Frank interview, part 1

Sep 20, 2018

We'll be back with your regularly scheduled Morning Report soon, but right now we're bringing you part one of our interview with Barney Frank and Chris Dodd, the former lawmakers behind one of the country’s largest financial reform bills. In a rare joint interview we're calling "The Politics of Crisis," they talk about their biggest regrets, why there won’t be any more bailouts and why they’re not worried about major rollbacks to Dodd-Frank.

Check back here for part two tomorrow. 

(09/20/18)

If the terms of your student loan agreement suddenly look different, if your bank opens a fake account in your name, or if your credit report is inaccurate, there’s a place that was specifically made for you to complain about that.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, now also known as the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection, has a submission portal that allows you to report an issue you’re having with a financial service or product.

We’re continuing our look at how technology is impacting Wall Street this week. Today, we explore how the tech industry is starting to question the whole idea of Wall Street.

The tech industry isn't always a big fan of the whole becoming-a-public-company process. Companies like Google, Facebook and most recently Spotify have tried disrupting initial public offerings with different share classes and direct listings. Then there's just deciding not to go public.

A few decades ago, a company had to go public in order to attract enough investment to grow significantly. But times have changed. According to The Wall Street Journal, last year $2.4 trillion in private money was raised in the United States compared to $2.1 trillion in public markets. What’s that mean for ordinary investors? Molly Wood puts that question to Nizar Tarhuni, head analyst at research firm PitchBook, and Howard Marks, CEO of StartEngine, a company that allows everyday investors to put money into private companies. (09/20/18)

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There is a disturbing trend in South Korea. Men are secretly recording women in public places. Michael Sullivan reports.

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What The F? Cathay Pacific Forgets One

Sep 20, 2018

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By all accounts, Florence was a massive, wet monster of a storm — and an expensive one, too. Its historic deluge swelled inland rivers and wrecked homes across the Carolinas, racking up costs that early estimates set as high as $22 billion.

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Will Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, testify?

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Remembering An Assault

Sep 20, 2018

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When writer Caitlin Flanagan read Christine Blasey Ford's accusation against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault, she instinctively believed her.

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Women represent 20 percent of Congress members right now, and Republicans and Democrats differ sharply on why that's the case, not to mention how big of a problem that is.

That in and of itself is perhaps unsurprising, especially at a time when the parties are heavily divided on a wide variety of topics. But a new poll shows that men and women within each party — and especially among Republicans — differ heavily on several of these questions.

Brett Kavanaugh is not the first presidential nominee to have his run to the Supreme Court frozen at the finish line by a woman's accusations.

Throughout this week of turmoil in Washington, the historical backstory has been the 1991 confrontation between Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas and a former colleague named Anita Hill.

Sen. Claire McCaskill says she will vote against Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court, but the Missouri Democrat, who is facing re-election in November, says it is not because of allegations of sexual misconduct swirling around the nominee.

In a statement posted to Twitter on Wednesday, McCaskill says the allegations made by Christine Blasey Ford — the professor who says Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when the two were teenagers — are "troubling" and need to be examined.

Kavanaugh says the allegation is false.

Disgraced former Chicago Police Cmdr. Jon Burge, who was convicted of lying about torturing suspects, died at 70 in Florida on Wednesday.

Burge was accused of leading a crew of rogue detectives who abused more than 100 African-American men. Allegations of brutal tactics to coerce confessions from suspects dogged the former South Side police commander and his subordinates throughout the 1970s and into the early 1990s. Suspects told horrifying stories about being beaten, burned, electro-shocked or suffocated with plastic typewriter covers and abused in other ways.

Nearly a third of households in the United States have struggled to pay their energy bills, the Energy Information Administration said in a report released Wednesday. The differences were minor in terms of geography, but Hispanics and racial minorities were hit hardest.

When an economy needs refugees

Sep 19, 2018

The White House said this week it will cut the number of refugees allowed into the country to 30,000 next year from the 45,000-person limit for 2018. That's a record low for the United States, which worries many local economies that depend on immigrant and refugee labor. Erie, Pennsylvania, is one of those places. The city strategically welcomed and resettled refugees when the population was shrinking and jobs were disappearing.

There was some big news this week in the auto and tech industries, which are increasingly overlapping. The world's largest automotive partnership, the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance, which sold more than 10 million cars around the world last year, is going to start embedding Google's Android operating system in its cars starting in 2021.  The promise for consumers?  Infotainment systems that do more and are less, shall we say, buggy. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

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